20 Cybersecurity Certifications to Advance Your Cybersecurity Career

  • July 04, 2024
Author

Emily Bonnie

Senior Content Marketing Manager at Secureframe

Reviewer

Rob Gutierrez

Senior Compliance Manager at Secureframe

Today, the cybersecurity workforce is short four million workers worldwide, and the World Economic Forum estimates that by 2030 this global talent shortage could jump to 85 million workers. This talent gap presents a massive challenge for organizations that need to safeguard their operations against an increase in cyber threats — Gartner predicts that by 2025, lack of talent or human failure will be responsible for over half of all significant cybersecurity incidents. 

The demand for skilled cybersecurity professionals has never been higher. For IT and information security professionals looking to advance their careers, obtaining relevant certifications can demonstrate expertise and open doors to new opportunities in this critical field.

Below, we explore 20 cybersecurity certification programs for both newcomers and experienced professionals. Whether you are just starting your journey in cybersecurity or looking to enhance your existing skills, these certifications will help you deepen your specializations, update your knowledge, and advance your career.

Career benefits of cybersecurity certification

A cybersecurity certification is a formal recognition awarded to learners who have demonstrated expertise in various areas of cybersecurity. These certifications are typically issued by professional organizations, educational institutions, or industry bodies after the candidate passes an exam or assessment.

Pursuing security certifications comes with a range of benefits, from a wider variety of job roles, career advancement, and deeper specialization. Let’s examine a few reasons why infosec and IT professionals might pursue a professional certificate in cybersecurity.

Career advancement

Certifications can enhance your resume and make you a more attractive candidate for cybersecurity job opportunities. Many employers require or prefer candidates with specific certifications. Because certifications can demonstrate your commitment to the field and your willingness to invest in your professional development, certified professionals also often have better chances of getting promoted and can command higher salaries.

Specialized knowledge and skills

Earning a certification validates your knowledge and skills in a specific area of cybersecurity, ensuring you meet industry standards and stay up to date with the evolving landscape. Certification programs often require continuing education, ensuring that you stay current with the latest trends, tools, and techniques in cybersecurity.

Enhanced credibility

Certifications can enhance your professional credibility and reputation within the industry, making it easier to gain the trust of employers, colleagues, and clients. Certifications provide a standardized benchmark of skills and knowledge as well, which can be particularly useful in a field as dynamic and complex as cybersecurity.

Networking opportunities

Many certification bodies offer access to professional networks, including forums, conferences, and other events, where you can connect with peers, mentors, and potential employers. Being part of a certified community provides support, resources, and opportunities for collaboration and knowledge sharing.

Regulatory compliance

In some industries, certifications are necessary to comply with regulations and standards. For example, certain government, healthcare, or military roles may require specific certifications. In addition, many organizations require their employees to have certain certifications to meet internal or external compliance requirements.

Entry-level cybersecurity certifications to accelerate your career

If you’re looking to launch your career in the cybersecurity industry, these certifications can give you the knowledge and credentials you need to strengthen your resume. While the programs below may recommend some professional experience, they do not have formal prerequisite requirements, making them more accessible to newcomers. 

1. Certified in Cybersecurity - (ISC)2

The Certified in Cybersecurity (CC) certification is designed to validate foundational knowledge and skills in cybersecurity, making it an excellent starting point for individuals seeking to enter the field, including recent graduates and career changers.

The CC certification covers five primary topics:

  • Foundational security concepts and principles
  • Business continuity, disaster recovery, and incident response planning and processes
  • Identity management and access controls
  • Basic network security concepts and practices
  • Knowledge of daily security operations and administrative activities.

The 2-hour CC exam consists of multiple-choice questions designed to assess the candidate’s understanding of the foundational cybersecurity concepts covered in the curriculum. CC holders must earn at least 15 Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits each year and a total of 45 CPE credits over a three-year certification cycle to maintain their credentials. They must also pay an annual maintenance fee. 

2. CompTIA Security+ - CompTIA

The CompTIA Security+ is an entry-level certification that covers foundational cybersecurity skills and knowledge. Offered by the Computing Technology Industry Association, the CompTIA Security+ certification covers six primary domains:

  • Threats and attacks: Understanding various types of cyberattacks and vulnerabilities and how to mitigate them.
  • Technologies and tools: Knowledge of various security technologies and tools used to protect information systems.
  • Architecture and design: Principles of secure network architecture and design, including secure systems design.
  • Identity and access management: Concepts and methods for managing identity and access to systems and data.
  • Risk management: Understanding risk management processes, including policies, regulations, and best practices.
  • Cryptography and PKI: Basic principles of cryptography and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI).

The Security+ exam consists of multiple-choice and performance-based (hands-on) questions. Candidates have 90 minutes to complete the exam.

While there are no formal prerequisites, CompTIA recommends that candidates have at least two years of work experience in IT with a focus on security and hold the CompTIA Network+ certification (or equivalent knowledge).

3. Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge - CSA

Offered by the Cloud Security Alliance, the CCSK is a widely recognized certification designed to validate a candidate's knowledge of cloud security fundamentals and best practices. 

The CCSK certification is based on two key documents. First is the CSA Security Guidance for Critical Areas of Focus in Cloud Computing, which lists best practices for securing cloud environments. Second is the ENISA Cloud Computing: Benefits, Risks, and Recommendations for Information Security, which provides insights into the risks and benefits of cloud computing and recommendations for secure cloud usage.

The CCSK curriculum covers the following topics:

  • The components and architecture of cloud computing
  • Managing risks and data governance in the cloud
  • Navigating legal and contractual issues in cloud environments
  • Ensuring compliance with relevant standards and conducting audits
  • Securing management interfaces and ensuring business continuity
  • Securing cloud infrastructure, including networks, storage, and compute resources
  • Understanding security issues related to virtualization and containerization technologies
  • Preparing for and responding to security incidents in the cloud
  • Securing applications deployed in cloud environments
  • Protecting cloud data through encryption and other security measures
  • Managing identities and access controls in the cloud
  • Utilizing security services provided by cloud providers

The 90-minute CCSK exam consists of 60 multiple-choice questions. Once earned, the certification remains valid indefinitely and does not require renewal. 

4. Offensive Security Certified Professional (OSCP) - Offensive Security

The OSCP is designed to assess a candidate's ability to perform penetration testing and ethical hacking. The OSCP certification is recognized for its rigorous, hands-on approach, requiring candidates to demonstrate their ability to identify and exploit vulnerabilities in various systems within a controlled environment.

The OSCP training program, known as "Penetration Testing with Kali Linux (PWK)," covers a wide range of topics, including:

  • Penetration testing methodologies
  • Using Kali Linux for penetration testing
  • Techniques to gather information about targets
  • Identifying and analyzing security vulnerabilities
  • Understanding and exploiting buffer overflow vulnerabilities in Windows and Linux applications
  • Using and modifying exploits to achieve specific goals
  • Techniques to transfer files to and from compromised systems
  • Exploiting common web application vulnerabilities
  • Techniques to crack passwords and gain unauthorized access
  • Bypassing network restrictions and firewalls through port redirection and tunneling
  • Exploiting Active Directory environments

The OSCP exam is a 24-hour practical exam, where candidates are required to compromise a series of machines within a controlled environment. The exam consists of multiple target machines with varying point values based on their difficulty. Points are awarded based on the successful exploitation of vulnerabilities and the quality of the documentation provided.

Candidates are expected to have a solid understanding of TCP/IP networking, Linux and Windows operating systems, and basic programming or scripting skills. While the OSCP certification does not require continuing education or renewal, many professionals choose to stay current with new techniques and technologies by pursuing additional certifications and training.

5. Certified Cybersecurity Technician (CCT) - Mile2

The C|CT is a foundational cybersecurity skills and knowledge certification, typically targeted at entry-level professionals beginning their careers in cybersecurity. C|CT certification equips them with the essential skills needed to handle various cybersecurity challenges and provides a recognized credential.

The C|CT certification covers a broad range of topics, including network security, identifying threats and vulnerabilities, cryptography, security operations, and compliance standards.

The exam typically consists of multiple-choice questions that assess the candidate’s knowledge and understanding of key curriculum topics. The length of the exam and the number of questions may vary depending on the certifying body.

6. GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC) - GIAC

The GSEC is a globally recognized credential offered by the Global Information Assurance Certification. It is designed for professionals who want to demonstrate their knowledge of information security beyond simple terminology and concepts. The GSEC certification focuses on the practical skills and knowledge needed to implement and manage security practices within an organization.

The GSEC certification covers several key areas, including:

  • Access control models and best practices
  • Cryptographic algorithms, key management, and encryption applications
  • Designing and implementing secure network infrastructures
  • Identifying, responding to, and mitigating security incidents
  • Securing network devices, protocols, and services
  • Developing and implementing effective security policies and procedures
  • Understanding common software vulnerabilities and secure coding practices
  • Securing Windows and Linux/Unix-based systems and networks
  • Protecting web applications and servers from common threats and vulnerabilities

The GSEC exam consists of 100+ multiple-choice and matching questions. Candidates have 5 hours to complete the exam. GSEC holders must renew their certification every four years by earning 36 CPE credits and paying a renewal fee.

7. GIAC Certified Incident Handler (GCIH) - GIAC

The GCIH is aimed at professionals responsible for incident handling and response and is designed to validate the knowledge and skills required to detect, respond to, and mitigate cyber threats.

The GCIH certification covers:

  • Common attack techniques, tools, and methodologies
  • Techniques for detecting intrusions and suspicious activities
  • Tools and technologies to support incident response
  • Techniques for identifying the root cause of incidents and implementing corrective actions
  • Identifying and addressing vulnerabilities in systems and networks.
  • Understanding and mitigating DoS and Distributed DoS (DDoS) attacks.
  • Techniques for detecting, analyzing, and mitigating malware infections.

The 5-hour exam consists of 100+ multiple-choice and matching questions. GCIH holders must renew their certification every four years by earning 36 CPE credits and paying a renewal fee.

8. GIAC Penetration Tester (GPEN) - GIAC

The GPEN is offered by the Global Information Assurance Certification and is designed to validate an individual's ability to identify and mitigate security vulnerabilities through penetration testing and ethical hacking. The GPEN certification emphasizes the practical, hands-on skills required to perform comprehensive penetration tests.

It covers several key areas, including:

  • Understanding the fundamentals of penetration testing, including methodologies and best practices
  • Techniques for gathering information about targets, including passive and active reconnaissance methods
  • Identifying live hosts, open ports, and services running on target systems
  • Exploiting vulnerabilities to gain access to systems and escalate privileges
  • Techniques for maintaining access and covering tracks after gaining access to target systems
  • Methods for cracking and guessing passwords to gain unauthorized access
  • Identifying and exploiting vulnerabilities in web applications
  • Techniques for testing the security of wireless networks
  • Documenting findings and preparing penetration test reports

The 3-hour exam consists of multiple-choice and matching questions. GPEN certification must be renewed every four years by earning 36 CPE credits and paying a renewal fee.

9. Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate - Cisco

The Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate certification focuses on foundational security principles and the essentials of working in a Security Operations Center (SOC), including monitoring, detecting, and responding to cybersecurity threats.

Candidates should have a basic understanding of computer networks and cybersecurity concepts. The certification covers two main areas:

  • Foundational security concepts, including cybersecurity fundamentals, security monitoring, host-based analysis, network intrusion analysis, and security policies and procedures.
  • Security monitoring and operations, including continuous monitoring and analysis tools, incident response, data analysis, and event and network intrusion analysis.

The CyberOps Associate certification requires passing the 200-201 CBROPS (Understanding Cisco Cybersecurity Operations Fundamentals) exam, which consists of multiple choice, drag-and-drop, and hands-on simulation questions. Certification is valid for three years. To maintain certification, candidates must pass a recertification exam or earn continuing education credits within the three-year period.

10. Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP) - IAPP

Offered by the International Association of Privacy Professionals, the CIPP is designed for professionals who manage, handle, and protect personal data in compliance with various privacy laws and regulations.

The CIPP offers several specializations based on different regions and privacy laws:

  • CIPP/US: US privacy laws and regulations, including federal and state laws
  • CIPP/E: European privacy laws and regulations, including GDPR
  • CIPP/C: Canadian privacy laws and regulations, including PIPEDA
  • CIPP/A: Asia-Pacific privacy laws and regulations
  • CIPP/G: US government privacy laws and regulations.

The CIPP certification covers several key areas, including the fundamentals of privacy and data protection, laws and regulations, data subject rights, and data protection best practices. The exam is 2.5 hours long and consists of 90 multiple-choice questions. Certification must be renewed annually by earning the required CPE credits and paying a renewal fee.

11. Certified Information Privacy Manager (CIPM) - IAPP

The CIPM is another respected certification offered by the IAPP for data privacy professionals. It focuses on the operational aspects of privacy program management and equips individuals with the skills and knowledge necessary to establish, manage, and improve privacy programs.

The CIPM certification covers several key areas, structured around two main modules:

  • Module 1: Privacy program governance. This module covers the fundamentals of data privacy and the role of a privacy manager, including how to build a privacy governance framework, applicable privacy laws and regulations, how to conduct data protection impact assessments, and managing data subject rights and requests.
  • Module 2: Privacy program framework: This module focuses on how to implement a privacy governance framework, including implementing controls, training personnel, incident response, and monitoring privacy program performance.

The 2.5-hour exam consists of 90 multiple-choice questions. CIPM holders must earn 20 CPE credits annually and pay a renewal fee to maintain their certification.

12. Microsoft Cyber Security Analyst Professional Certificate - Microsoft

The Microsoft Cyber Security Analyst Professional Certificate is designed to equip individuals with the skills and knowledge needed to pursue a career in cybersecurity. This certification focuses on various aspects of cybersecurity, including threat management, security operations, and incident response, using Microsoft technologies and solutions.

The certification program typically includes a series of courses, each focusing on different aspects of cybersecurity and Microsoft technologies:

  • Identifying and managing cybersecurity threats using Microsoft technologies.
  • Implementing and managing security operations to protect IT infrastructure.
  • Responding to and recovering from security incidents.
  • Using Microsoft security solutions such as Microsoft Defender, Azure Security Center, and Microsoft Sentinel.

While there are no formal prerequisites for enrolling in the Microsoft Cyber Security Analyst Professional Certificate program, a basic understanding of IT concepts and Microsoft technologies is recommended.

The certification program typically includes written assessments and a hands-on capstone project to demonstrate the candidate's knowledge and skills. 

Advanced cybersecurity certifications for experienced professionals

For professionals looking to acquire specialized knowledge or deepen their expertise, these certifications can demonstrate an advanced understanding of essential cybersecurity concepts and skills. 

13. Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) - (ISC)2

Recognized worldwide as a benchmark for information security professionals, the CISSP is designed to validate expertise in designing, implementing, and managing a best-in-class cybersecurity program. The CISSP is offered by the International Information System Security Certification Consortium, also known as (ISC)2.

To be eligible for CISSP certification, candidates must have a minimum of five years of cumulative, paid, full-time work experience in two or more of the eight domains of the (ISC)2 Common Body of Knowledge (CBK):

  1. Security and risk management
  2. Asset security
  3. Security architecture and engineering
  4. Communication and network security
  5. Identity and access management
  6. Security assessment and testing
  7. Security operations
  8. Software development security 

One year of work experience can be waived if the candidate holds a four-year bachelor’s degree or an additional credential from the (ISC)2 approved list. If a candidate does not have the required experience, they can become an Associate of (ISC)2 by passing the CISSP exam and gaining the necessary experience within six years.

The CISSP exam consists of 100+ multiple-choice and advanced innovative questions, and candidates have up to three hours to complete it. The adaptive exam adjusts the difficulty of questions based on the candidate's performance as the exam progresses.

CISSP holders must earn at least 40 CPE credits each year and a total of 120 CPE credits over a three-year certification cycle to maintain their certification. They must also pay an annual maintenance fee.

14. Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) - ISACA

The CISA is a highly regarded certification offered by ISACA, designed for professionals who audit, control, monitor, and assess an organization’s information technology and business systems. The certification program focuses on evaluating and auditing an organization’s information systems and related processes to ensure they are secure, reliable, and compliant with laws and regulations.

The CISA certification covers five primary domains:

  • Auditing process: Planning, executing, and reporting on information system audits.
  • IT governance: Ensuring that IT governance and management practices support the organization’s strategies and objectives.
  • Information systems development, implementation, and operation: Ensuring that systems and infrastructure are acquired, developed, implemented, and operate in a way that meets the organization’s business resilience objectives.
  • Protection of information assets: Ensuring that information assets are protected and managed effectively.

Candidates must have a minimum of five years of work experience in information systems auditing, or security. Experience must be gained within the 10-year period preceding the application date or within five years from the date of passing the exam. Up to three years of experience can be substituted with specific educational or certification credits, such as a degree in information security or information systems, or other relevant certifications).

The CISA exam consists of 150 multiple-choice questions, and candidates have four hours to complete the exam. CISA holders must earn at least 20 CPE credits annually and a total of 120 CPE credits over a three-year certification cycle. Certified professionals must also pay an annual maintenance fee to keep their certification active.

15. Certified Cloud Security Professional (CCSP) - (ISC)2

The CCSP is designed to validate the advanced skills and knowledge required to secure cloud environments and is ideal for IT and information security professionals who are responsible for applying best practices to cloud security architecture, design, operations, and service orchestration.

The CCSP certification covers six primary domains:

  • Cloud concepts, architecture, and design: Understanding cloud computing concepts and architecture, and designing secure cloud solutions.
  • Cloud data security: Securing data in the cloud, including data lifecycle management, encryption, and data privacy.
  • Cloud platform and infrastructure security: Securing cloud infrastructure, including compute, storage, and network security.
  • Cloud application security: Securing applications deployed in cloud environments, including software development lifecycle (SDLC) and DevOps practices.
  • Cloud security operations: Managing and maintaining secure cloud operations, including incident response and business continuity.
  • Legal, risk, and compliance: Understanding legal and regulatory issues, risk management, and compliance requirements in cloud environments.

Candidates must have a minimum of five years of cumulative, paid work experience in information technology, of which three years must be in information security, and one year in one or more of the six domains of the (ISC)2 CBK. Candidates can become Associates of (ISC)2 by passing the CCSP exam if they do not yet have the required experience, provided they gain the necessary experience within six years.

The CCSP exam consists of 125 multiple-choice questions, and candidates have four hours to complete the exam. CCSP holders must earn at least 30 CPE credits each year and a total of 90 CPE credits over a three-year certification cycle, as well as pay an annual maintenance fee, to maintain certification.

16. Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC) - ISACA

The CRISC is designed for professionals who manage and control enterprise IT risk and ensure that IT strategies align with business objectives. The CRISC certification focuses on identifying, evaluating, managing, and mitigating risks.

The CRISC certification covers four primary topics:

  • Governance: Establishing and maintaining a governance framework to support risk management and business objectives.
  • Risk assessment: Identifying and assessing IT risks to determine their impact on business objectives.
  • Risk response and mitigation: Developing and implementing strategies to mitigate identified risks.
  • Risk and control monitoring and reporting: Monitoring and reporting on risk and control activities to ensure effective risk management.

Candidates must have a minimum of three years of cumulative, paid work experience in at least two of the four domains covered by the CRISC certification. The experience must be within the 10-year period preceding the application date or within five years from the date of passing the exam.

The CRISC exam lasts four hours and consists of 150 multiple-choice questions. CRISC holders must earn and submit at least 20 CPE hours annually and a total of 120 CPE hours over a three-year certification cycle, as well as pay an annual maintenance fee.

17. Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) - EC-Council

The CEH, offered by the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants, is designed to equip professionals with the skills and knowledge needed to identify and address security vulnerabilities in computer systems, networks, and applications by using the same tools and techniques as malicious hackers. Unlike malicious hackers, ethical hackers operate with the permission of the system owner and within the confines of the law.

CEH certification focuses on understanding how hackers think and operate. This helps professionals anticipate potential threats and take proactive measures to protect systems. The certification emphasizes hands-on experience with various hacking tools and techniques to assess and improve the organization’s overall security posture.

The CEH curriculum covers a wide range of topics, including vulnerability analysis, system hacking, malware threats, social engineering, SQL injection, and cryptography. The exam consists of 100+ multiple-choice questions, and candidates have four hours to complete the exam.

To be eligible to complete the exam, candidates should have at least two years of work experience in information security. Candidates can either attend an official EC-Council training or provide proof of two years of cybersecurity work experience.

18. Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) - ISACA

The CISM is a globally recognized certification offered by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association designed for individuals who manage, design, and monitor an enterprise’s information security program. The CISM emphasizes the importance of aligning information security strategies with broader business goals and focuses on risk management, governance, and incident response.

The CISM certification covers four primary domains:

  • Information security governance: Establishing and maintaining an information security governance framework and supporting processes to ensure that the information security strategy is aligned with organizational goals and objectives.
  • Risk management: Identifying and managing information security risks to achieve business objectives.
  • Information security program development and management: Establishing and managing an information security program that aligns with the broader information security strategy.
  • Information security incident management: Planning, establishing, and managing the capability to detect, investigate, respond to, and recover from information security incidents.

Candidates must have a minimum of five years of work experience in information security management. Experience must be gained within the 10-year period preceding the application date or within five years from the date of passing the exam. Up to three years of experience can be substituted with specific educational or certification credits (e.g., a degree in information security, a degree in information systems, or other relevant certifications).

The CISM exam consists of 100+ multiple-choice questions. Candidates have four hours to complete the exam. CISM holders must earn 20 Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits annually and a total of 120 CPE hours over a three-year certification cycle, as well as pay an annual maintenance fee, to keep their certification active.

19. Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP) - (ISC)2

The SSCP is a globally recognized certification offered by (ISC)2 designed for IT administrators, managers, and network security professionals. It validates the practitioner's technical skills and knowledge to implement, monitor, and administer IT infrastructure using the security best practices, policies, and procedures established by (ISC)2.

The SSCP certification covers:

  • Access controls
  • Security operations and administration
  • Risk identification, monitoring, and analysis
  • Incident response and recovery
  • Cryptography
  • Network and communications security
  • Systems and application security

Candidates must have at least one year of cumulative work experience in one or more of the seven domains of the IC2 CBK. If a candidate does not have the required experience, they can become an Associate of (ISC)2 by passing the SSCP exam. They then have up to two years to gain the required experience.

The 3-hour SSCP exam consists of 125 multiple-choice questions. SSCP holders must earn at least 20 CPE credits each year, submit a total of 60 CPE credits over a three-year certification cycle, and pay an annual maintenance fee to keep their certification active.

20. AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Amazon Web Services

The AWS Certified Solutions Architect certification is designed to validate an individual's expertise in designing, deploying, and managing applications on the AWS platform. The certification is offered at two levels: Associate and Professional. 

The Associate level is ideal for professionals with some experience in AWS, typically with one or more years of hands-on experience designing available, cost-efficient, fault-tolerant, and scalable distributed systems on AWS. The program focuses on foundational AWS services and best practices for designing and deploying basic to moderately complex architectures. 

The Associate exam consists of multiple-choice and multiple-response questions and lasts approximately 2 hours. Candidates must be familiar with the AWS Management Console and basic AWS services.

The Professional level is most suitable for those with advanced experience looking to demonstrate deeper expertise in AWS architecture. Candidates must have already obtained the AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate certification to be eligible. 

The Professional certification focuses on complex architectures and advanced AWS services, including a deeper understanding of AWS best practices, architectural trade-offs, and cost optimization. The exam consists of multiple-choice and multiple-response questions and lasts approximately 3 hours. 

AWS certifications are valid for three years. Candidates must them recertify by taking the current version of the exam.

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FAQs

Which certification is best for cybersecurity?

The "best" certification for cybersecurity can vary depending on your career goals and current level of experience. However, some of the most respected and widely recognized certifications include:

  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP): Ideal for experienced security practitioners and managers, covering a broad range of security topics.
  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH): Focused on ethical hacking and pentests, valuable for roles in vulnerability assessment and security analysis.
  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM): Aimed at professionals managing and governing information security programs, essential for senior management positions.
  • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA): Essential for IT auditors, focusing on auditing, control, and assurance of information systems.
  • CompTIA Security+: An entry-level certification that covers fundamental cybersecurity concepts and is widely recognized for beginners.

What is the first cybersecurity certification you should get?

For individuals new to cybersecurity, the ISC2 Certified in Cybersecurity and CompTIA Security+ certifications are often recommended as the first certification to pursue. They provide a solid foundation in essential cybersecurity concepts and practices, including threat management, network security, and risk management. 

Can I get a cybersecurity job with just certifications?

Entry-level certifications like ISC2 Certified in Cybersecurity and CompTIA Security+ can help you get your foot in the door for junior roles or internships. However, employers often look for a combination of certifications, hands-on experience, and relevant skills.